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The Passe-Muraille, a tribute to Marcel Aymé

September 19, 2012
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Montmartre has a long history with art, be it painting, singing, writing or sculpting. Many monuments, statues or squares are scattered all around the hill to commemorate the memory of the artists that contributed to the glory of this neighborhood hill. Egyptian-born singer Dalida has a square named after her with a statue representing her bust, her house and her graveyard can be seen respectively on rue d’Orchampt or in the Montmartre Cemetery. The French actor Jean Gabin also has a square named after him. Many “plaques” on the facades of various houses remind people that famous inhabitants once lived there, Eric Satie, Hector Berlioz, Vincent Van Gogh or Pablo Picasso to name a few…

One of the most surprising tributes is the statue of the Passe-Muraille (“the Passer through Walls”), inspired by the eponym short story by Marcel Aymé and sculpted by French actor and sculptor Jean Marais.
The “Passe-Muraille” was written in 1943 and is the story of a man who lives rue Norvins in Montmartre and who has the special power of crossing walls. After falling in love, he gets stuck in a wall and is condemned to immobility forever. The statue is a tribute to both the novel and Marcel Aymé. It indeed represents the short story’s protagonist as only his torso, arms and right leg can be seen. It is located at the intersection of the rue Girardon and the rue Norvins, where the action takes place, on a square named “Square Marcel Aymé”.  In addition, the statue portrays Marcel Ayme, who lived in a nearby building until his death in 1967.
The statue is a source of astonishment for those who walk by and don’t expect to see it. Made of bronze, its color is uneven as people like to shake hands with it as they pose in front of it!

Le Passe-Muraille
Intersection of the rue Girardon and the rue Norvins
75018 Paris

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One Comment leave one →
  1. November 7, 2013 11:38 pm

    Reblogged this on Paris on Demand The Blog.

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